2019 Annual Conference

Philip Rycroft

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2019 CSaP Annual Conference

Held on 26 June 2019 at the Royal Society, London
This year was the 10th anniversary of CSaP. The celebratory Annual Conference brought together members of our network from government, academia and elsewhere to discuss some of the policy challenges we have worked on over the past year such as environmental policy; emerging technologies and social care; quantum computing; risk and uncertainty; and many more.

For a full list of speakers and topics, please download a copy of the conference agenda

To listen to the talks from our 2019 Annual Conference, click on the links below.


How Brexit is shaping the civil service, in five short chapters

The morning plenary talk was delivered by Claire Moriarty, Permanent Secretary for the Department for Exiting the European Union. Ms Moriarty kicked off the conference with a highly topical keynote speech on the impact of Brexit on the civil service.

You can listen to the talk here:


Environmental Policy: Improving how we manage and incentivise land management

This panel focused on the impact of Brexit on land reform with focus on farmers and agrocultural policies. The panel discussion was chaired by Emma Woods, Head of Policy, Wellbeing at the Royal Society, and included a diverse panel of experts: Henry Dieudonné-Demaria, Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs, Professor Bhaskar Vira, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge and Rohit Kaushish, National Farmers' Union of England and Wales (NFU).

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Healthcare Policy: Emerging technologies for social care

This panel discussed the opportunities and challenges of scaling technologies to support and improve social care in the UK. The panel included Chair George MacGinnis, UK Research & Innovation, Dr Malte Gerhold, Care Quality Commission, Christina Cornwell, Nesta and Dr Ben Maruthappu, Cera Care.

You can access Christina Cornwell's presentation here.

You can access George MacGinnis' presentation here.

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Extreme Risks – Challenges for evidence and policy

This panel explored extreme eventsand the policy challenges around preparedness and response to such events, using the Salisbury Novichok incident as a case study. The panel was chaired by Rumtin Sepasspour, Centre for the Study of Existential Risk. Panellists included Dr Luke Kemp, Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, Theresa, Go Science, Dr Dudley Hewlett, Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory and Georgina Collins, Defra.

You can access Georgina Collins' slides here.

You can access Luke Kemp's slides here.

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Countering Cybercrime: Building Partnerships of Interdisciplinary Research and CrossSector Stakeholders

Chaired by Dr Tristram Riley-Smith, Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research, this panel discussed how cybercrime is affecting our world and what can be done to counter it. Panellists were Helen Evans, Home Office, Dr Alice Hutchings, Department of Computer Science and Technology, University of Cambridge, Dr Giocomo Persi Paoli, Rand Europe.

You can access Dr Giocomo Persi Paoli's presentation here.

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Intelligence as ideology: its history and future

The afternoon plenary talk, chaired by Dr Natasha McCarthy, was delivered by Dr Stephen Cave, Executive Director of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence. This talk was an investigation into the ideology of intelligence throughout modern history, its role in shaping society and the future prospects for society in the context of Artificial Intelligence.

You can find the presentation here.

You can listen to the talk here:


Technology & society

This panel focused on the role of technology in society and was chaired by Dr Marcus Tomalin and panellists included Dr Leonie Tanczer, Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy, UCL, David Knight, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and Vinous Ali, Tech UK.

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Opportunities & challenges of quantum technologies

This panel consisting people from academia, defence research and government, discussed the present state of quantum thechnologies in the UK and its future. The panel was chaired by Dr Stephen Till, Cyber and Information Systems Division from the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), Professor Tim Spiller, Centre for Quantum Technologies, University of York and Louis Barson, Future Sectors, BEIS.

You can find Stephen Till's presentation here.

You can find Tim Spiller's presentation here.

You can find Louis Barson's presentation here.

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Impact of climate change on marine systems

This panel looked at both the science and policy regarding marine conservation, both national and international, in the context of climate change. The panel was chaired by Dr Molly Morgan Jones, British Academy, Dr Gemma Harper, Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs, Professor Robert Marsh, National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, Dr Nick Hardman-Mountford, Commonwealth Secretariat.

You can find Robert Marsh' presentation here.

You can find Nick Hardman-Mountford's presentation here.

You can listen to the panel discussion here:


Place policy after Brexit

This final plenary session explored the impacts of Brexit on place policies. Two different persepctives were offered by Professor Michael Kenny, Bennett Institute of Public Policy and Philip Rycroft, former Permanent Secretary, Department for Exiting the European Union respectively and was chaired by Professor Diane Coyle, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge.

You can listen to the talk here:


Conference Partners and Sponsors

The conference sponsors and partners were the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States, and supported by the Cambridge Centre for the study of Existential Risk, The Royal Society and Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence.