Professor John Naughton

Senior Research Fellow at Centre for Research in the Arts Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), University of Cambridge

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Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), University of Cambridge
Emeritus Professor of the Public Understanding of Technology, Open University
Director, Press Fellowship Programme, Wolfson College

John Naughton is a Senior Research Fellow at CRASSH, Emeritus Professor of the Public Understanding of Technology at the Open University, Director of the Press Fellowship Programme at Wolfson College and the technology columnist of the Observer.

By background a systems engineer, he is an historian of the Internet whose main research interests lie in the network's impact on society. At CRASSH, he is co-director (with Sir Richard Evans and Professor David Runciman) of a five-year research project on 'Conspiracy and Democracy', and he was co-director (with David Runciman) of a two-year research project on Technology and Democracy which has recently finished. He has written extensively on technology and its role in society, is the author of a well-known history of the Internet – A Brief History of the Future (Phoenix, 2000). His most recent book, 'From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: what you really need to know about the Internet', is published by Quercus.

  • 14 November 2017, 5:30pm

    Can you handle the truth? Facts, figures and communicating uncertainty

    Chaired and hosted by Sir David Spiegelhalter, Winton Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge, guest speakers include: Sir David Norgrove, Chair of the UK Statistics Authority; and Amanda Farnsworth, Head of Visual and Data Journalism, BBC News.

  • 6 June 2017, 5:30pm

    Dr S T Lee Public Policy Lecture: Geoff Mulgan, Nesta

    This lecture will present examples of how the world could be more collectively intelligent about collective intelligence, and how we might avoid a widening gap between the technical achievements of artificial machine intelligence, and the actual intelligence of the systems on which our lives depend.