Professor Richard Jones

Chair in Materials Physics and Innovation Policy & Associate Vice-President for Innovation and Regional Economic Development at University of Manchester

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Chair in Materials Physics and Innovation Policy & Associate Vice-President for Innovation and Regional Economic Development

Richard is an experimental soft matter physicist. His first degree and PhD in Physics both come from Cambridge University. Following postdoctoral work at Cornell University, USA, he was a lecturer at the University of Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory, before moving to Sheffield in 1998. In 2006 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, in recognition of his work in the field of polymers and biopolymers at surfaces and interfaces, and in 2009 he won the Tabor Medal of the UK’s Institute of Physics for his contributions to nanoscience.

He is the author of more than 190 research papers, and three books, Polymers at Surfaces and Interfaces (with Randal Richards, CUP 1999), Soft Condensed Matter, (OUP 2002), and Soft Machines: Nanotechnology and Life (OUP 2004).

He was Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Innovation at Sheffield from 2009 to 2016, was a member of EPSRC Council from 2013 – 2018, and chaired Research England’s Technical Advisory Group for the Knowledge Exchange Framework. He has written extensively about science and innovation policy, and was a member of the Sheffield/Manchester Industrial Strategy Commission. He was a Visiting Research Fellow at CSAP in 2016/17.

  • 13 November 2017, 4:30pm

    Science and the future of Democracy

    The Cambridge Institute for Public Policy, the Centre for Science and Policy, and Churchill College are working together to launch a new programme on science and the future of democracy.

  • 14 February 2017, 12:45pm

    Devolution and inclusive economic growth (Manchester)

    Devolution offers new opportunities for inclusive economic growth. This workshop will bring together academics from the Universities of Cambridge and Manchester with policy professionals from local government to explore working together in city areas to enhance economic opportunities across the population.

  • In news articles

    Testing times for evidence and expertise: what lies ahead for science and innovation?

    Will political events of 2016 provoke a fundamental rethink of the role of institutions at the intersection of science, innovation, expertise, politics and power?