Sam Reed

Senior Policy Adviser, Emissions Trading at Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Share
Senior Policy Adviser, Emissions Trading, BEIS
Policy Fellow, Centre for Science and Policy

Sam is interested in all aspects of climate policy, but has particular interest in:

  • How cap and trade policy should evolve to decarbonise different sectors at different stages of decarbonisation.

  • The role of markets in climate policy.

  • How our understanding of complex climate systems can inform our understanding and development of the, arguably, equally complex problem of decarbonising all aspects of an economy.

On policy making in general, he is interested in the ‘science’ of policy making, decision making under uncertainty, and how policy makers assess and make decisions on the back of trade-offs when designing climate policy.

Sam’s background is in Earth Sciences – specialising in climate science – and worked in particular on climate system dynamics. In government, he has worked in energy policy strategy and environmental legislation, and now leads on market policy for the UK Emissions Trading System, which includes the policy to set the cap and cap trajectory, allocation of allowances (auctioning vs free), and mechanisms to support market stability.

  • In news articles

    Synthesising Compelling Evidence: Insights for Early Career Researchers

    On the 9th of March, NERC-funded doctoral students attended the second workshop session in a two-part professional development programme hosted by the Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP). The objective of this session was to give PhD students hands-on experience of delivering scientific advice to policymakers. Students were divided into groups and asked to produce policy briefings to be judged by a panel featuring Professor Sir David King, Professor Bill Sutherland and Sam Reed. This exercise was accompanied by presentations exploring speakers’ career trajectories in academia and policy.

  • In news articles

    Giving Advice to Government: Insights for Early Career Researchers

    How should researchers synthesise diverse evidence and construct compelling answers to policy questions? What are the differences between being an honest broker of information and an issue advocate? How can early-career researchers get involved with the world of policy?