Latest news

Subscribe to RSS
  • 11 February 2022

    UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Trade-offs

    Dr Isabel Jones, Research Fellow in Biological and Environmental Sciences at the University of Stirling delivered the third edition of CSaP’s Future Leaders Fellows Seminar series. Her research focuses on how we can achieve UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) equitably, in scenarios where one SDG may be prioritised at the expense of another.
  • 20 January 2022

    Life in the Anthropocene

    CSaP’s Horn Fellows hosted an evening event for academics and policy makers, in conjunction with Cambridge Zero. Howard Covington, Chair of the Alan Turing Institute, discussed the history of the Anthropocene, an unofficial term for the geological period we are currently living in, and his projections for the future.
  • 21 December 2021

    The challenges facing the environment and society

    Dr Molly Anderson led the final session of CSaP’s seminar series on government’s use of data, science, and evidence. Using her perspective of working in the Environment Agency’s Chief Scientist’s Group, she discussed the concept of reflexivity and the crucial role it could play in tackling current environmental challenges.
  • 17 December 2021

    The science of mitigating natural disasters

    As part of CSaP’s seminar series on government data, science, and evidence, Dr Amy Donovan from the University of Cambridge led a discussion on how science is used to generate effective warning systems in the face of impending natural disasters or environmental risks.
  • 17 December 2021

    Arm’s length bodies in the COVID-19 response

    The Centre for Science and Policy hosted a seminar on how ALBs were used in the COVID-19 response, as part of its Policy Fellow series on the government’s use of data, science, and evidence. Speakers Matthew Gill and Grant Dalton, from the Institute for Government, outlined their research on the interface between health focused ALBs and central government during the pandemic.
  • 7 December 2021

    How can data science inform infrastructure policy?

    As part of the CSaP Policy Fellow seminar series on government’s use of data, science and evidence, Mark Enzer, Chief Technical Officer for Mott MacDonald and Director of the Centre for Digital Built Britain, led a discussion on how data science can be used to inform infrastructure policy.
  • 19 November 2021

    Moving forward with social infrastructure policy

    On 1 November 2021, the Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP) held a workshop on social infrastructure at the British Academy. It was organised in partnership with the British Academy, the Bennett Institute of Public Policy, and Power to Change. The attendees were academics, advocates, policymakers, and researchers with expertise in social infrastructure policy.
  • 14 October 2021

    Climate change and the economy: what COP26 needs to know

    With weeks to go until COP26, CSaP's Executive Director Rob Doubleday talks to two of Cambridge's leading economists Dr Matthew Agarwala and Dr Cristina Peñasco, about what leaders need to know and do, to delivery a clean, green recovery. The event was hosted as part of the University of Cambridge's Alumni Festival 2021.
  • 13 October 2021

    The rapid decarbonisation of healthcare

    Healthcare is one of the largest contributors to the UK’s total carbon footprint. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic the NHS experienced a rapid change in the delivery of healthcare: can this sense of critical urgency be harnessed and applied to the decarbonisation of the National Health Service?
  • 15 December 2020

    Science, Policy & A Green Recovery: Planetary Health and Human Health

    Could climate change or deforestation cause the next pandemic? In the final episode of our series on Science, Policy and a Green Recovery, host Dr Rob Doubleday and guest host Kate McNeil explore the links between planetary health and human health. Throughout the episode, they hear about how human activity is placing pressure on the natural world and how that can influence the risks posed by zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. They also address how unsustainable human activities and climate change are contributing threats to human health from non-communicable diseases and as a consequence of natural disasters.