Professor Kern Alexander

Senior Research Fellow at Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS)

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Senior Research Fellow, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge

Professor Kern Alexander is a Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Financial Analysis and Policy at the Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. His research interests include: International and European financial regulation (Basel III and CRD); interaction between macro- and micro-prudential regulation; the historical development of the International Financial Institutions (BIS and IMF); the economic and legal aspects of financial regulation and its impact on bank corporate governance; and the development of globalised financial markets and its impact on the regulatory strategies of global financial institutions.

Professor Alexander was appointed to the Chair of Law and Finance at the University of Zurich in 2009. Since 2005, he has headed the Financial Regulation project at the Centre for Financial Analysis and Policy, University of Cambridge. He was also an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Senior Research Fellow in International Political Economy and Law (2006-2009) and was a joint investigator on the ESRC World Economy and Finance Programme's research project 'The Legal and Economic Aspects of Sovereign Debt Finance'. He has led academic research grants from the UK ESRC, the European Commission and the European Parliament. He was educated at Cornell, Oxford and Cambridge Universities.

He has served as an adviser to the British Government and the European Parliament's Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee. He is a Member of the European Parliament's Expert Panel on Financial Services. In August 2011, he was appointed Specialist Adviser to the UK Parliamentary Joint Select Committee on the Financial Services Bill 2012.

  • 16 January 2014, 5:30pm

    Adaptation to climate change: Seminar 1

    In his first seminar, Professor Kennel will give a brief history of the development of climate research - the relationship between atmospheric abundance of CO2 and global temperature over time, and fundamental truths about the long-term future.